Educational plan – Intuttitalia http://intuttitalia.com/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 01:03:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://intuttitalia.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-2-120x120.png Educational plan – Intuttitalia http://intuttitalia.com/ 32 32 Youngkin criticizes Va’s school accreditation system https://intuttitalia.com/youngkin-criticizes-vas-school-accreditation-system/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 23:38:20 +0000 https://intuttitalia.com/youngkin-criticizes-vas-school-accreditation-system/ RICHMOND — That sounds like good news: Despite the intense challenges of the coronavirus pandemic, 89% of K-12 public schools in Virginia are fully accredited, up from 92% in the 2019-20 school year. But Gov. Glenn Youngkin (R), who won the job last year protesting extended school closures under Democrat Ralph Northam, greeted the accreditation […]]]>

RICHMOND — That sounds like good news: Despite the intense challenges of the coronavirus pandemic, 89% of K-12 public schools in Virginia are fully accredited, up from 92% in the 2019-20 school year.

But Gov. Glenn Youngkin (R), who won the job last year protesting extended school closures under Democrat Ralph Northam, greeted the accreditation findings that were announced this week with skepticism intense — and a call to scrap the way Virginia rates schools.

“This flawed accountability system does not provide a clear picture of the academic success and progress of our schools to parents, teachers and local school divisions,” he said in a written statement released Thursday evening, as he was campaigning for a Republican candidate for governor in Kansas.

Youngkin’s rationale for doubting the grades: They’re based on pass rates on standardized state tests known as learning standards, or SOLs, and those scores have plummeted over the past year. But his push for a new accreditation system is also part of his broader effort to declare that the state’s schools need a rescue. He fought against school mask mandates, critical race theory, “dividing” lessons, liberal transgender policies, and sexually explicit books attributed without a parent’s permission.

That battle cry helped the political newcomer win the executive mansion and could fuel a bid for the White House in 2024. A busy schedule of out-of-state political travel that took him this week alone to Kansas and Texas fueled the buzz about a possible race.

Youngkin Superintendent Jillian Balow questioned the test results even as she announced the results.

“The school ratings we are releasing today do not reflect the scale of the crisis facing our schools and our students,” she said in a written statement.

She noted that accreditation had barely dropped in three years “despite significant declines in learning standards test scores in reading, math and science”.

The state has made provisions, in budget language endorsed by Youngkin, to help schools weather the post-pandemic decline in SOL scores without losing accreditation. The accreditation process still allows schools to average the last three years of SOL test results, if necessary, to even out occasional declines. The amendment allowed schools to average their most recent SOL results with scores from the two years before the pandemic.

“We intentionally put in language to save people from having to use covid data” alone, Del said. Carrie E. Coyner (R-Chesterfield), member of the House Education Committee who sponsored the amendment and said she was “not surprised” that credentials remained fairly stable as a result.

But she also said she agrees with Youngkin’s call for revamping the accreditation system to provide “a more accurate flashlight” on student skills.

Youngkin’s response upset some Democrats, who noted that Virginia schools are consistently ranked among the best in the nation. Of the. Schuyler VanValkenburg (Henrico), a public high school teacher, tweeted a link to a WalletHub study ranking them fourth.

“He’s going to get on his horse and fix everything because our school system is so broken,” said Sen. Mamie E. Locke (D-Hampton), a member of the Senate Education and Health Committee.

Atif Qarni, who served as education secretary under Northam, defended the accreditation standards as the “nuanced” product of extensive study and cooperation between two Democratic governors and the Trump administration.

“He’s fabricated that there’s this crisis in public education,” Qarni said, “So whenever there’s facts that show that’s not the case, he’s going to push that back. “

But some Republicans steeped in state education policy say Youngkin is right.

“The system was not designed to provide a true skill assessment,” Del said. Glenn R. Davis (R-Virginia Beach), chairman of the House Education Committee.

Virginia’s accreditation standards were overhauled after Congress passed the Every Student Succeeds Act in 2015, a bipartisan bill that ordered each state to update its accreditation standards, Qarni said. Virginia began work on its update under the then government. Terry McAuliffe (D) and completed the process in 2018 under Northam, who secured the required approval from President Trump’s Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.

“It was not a hot topic,” Qarni said.

The main change brought by the updated standards: schools would be graded not only on overall pass rates, but on improved performance of certain subgroups, such as English language learners, special education students or low-income students.

“Under the old system, if a school division had 70 percent success in reading and math, then it was fine,” Qarni said. “In the new system, it has become more nuanced. … If you demonstrate that certain sub-groups are doing well, you will be credited.

While Qarni said the old system masked stubborn failures among special-needs students, Youngkin and some other Republicans see it the other way around — that the current one masks failures in overall performance by giving schools credit for making progress with some sets of special-needs students.

If a school falls below the state standard, state officials can get involved by conducting an academic review and requiring an improvement plan. If a school refuses to do so, the school is denied accreditation. The school’s local school board is required to enter into a memorandum of understanding with the state school board to outline actions that would allow it to regain its accreditation.

Davis described the current accreditation system as “smoke and mirrors”.

“You can actually drop in skill and increase in growth and that would look good,” he said.

Davis wants the state to continue to track overall skills as well as the growth of subgroups with special needs, but he thinks the numbers should be presented separately and the growth should not be used to “artificially inflate” the grade from a school.

Youngkin tasked Balow and Education Secretary Aimee Guidera with coming up with a school evaluation system that will give Virginia “the most transparent and accountable education system in the country.”

Administration officials could not say Friday what that system would look like.

Balow in an interview said growth and proficiency should not be lumped together because they do not adequately measure the learning loss that students face across Virginia. She pointed to state assessments and national test scores that reflect historic learning losses in core math and reading subjects, arguing that the data obviously shows that students have struggled significantly.

“It’s not that we mean schools are bad,” Balow said. “But we certainly want to make sure that we see every student in an accreditation score and that we give communities as well as school divisions an opportunity to dig deeper into their data and say, ‘What do we need to do to improve? ?'”

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Maple Ridge School Board candidate wants better education plan for students https://intuttitalia.com/maple-ridge-school-board-candidate-wants-better-education-plan-for-students/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://intuttitalia.com/maple-ridge-school-board-candidate-wants-better-education-plan-for-students/ Better communication between parents and schools and a better education plan for students are top priorities for a candidate for the Maple Ridge School Board running in the upcoming election. Brian Dominick is running under the umbrella of election organization ParentsVoice BC, a group that supports independent school trustee candidates who they say “put the […]]]>

Better communication between parents and schools and a better education plan for students are top priorities for a candidate for the Maple Ridge School Board running in the upcoming election.

Brian Dominick is running under the umbrella of election organization ParentsVoice BC, a group that supports independent school trustee candidates who they say “put the needs of students and families first” and uphold “the values independent, families first”.

Dominick is a father of two and owns an e-bike and scooter shop in Maple Ridge.

If elected to the school board, he would also like to find ways to “fill the gaps in the ‘essential skills’ needed in today’s world”, and ensure that students receive daily physical education, exercise, he says, which is necessary in the digital world.

“Knowledge is power, and educating our children should be our top priority to put families first. If elected, I will work hard to give parents back their voice to shape the future of our children in the right direction to ensure that we give them the skills to thrive in the community and be the best they can be for reach their full potential,” said Dominick.

Dominick explained that over the past seven years his two boys have grown up in Maple Ridge and coached their sports, working well with parents to achieve team goals. He said he also worked with his son’s schools to “fill the gaps with sensitive situations such as bullying”.

Dominick graduated with a degree in Marketing and Sales from Langara College and holds a Bachelor of Commerce in Entrepreneurial Management from Royal Roads University.

He is also certified in Neurolinguistic Programming, a psychological approach to mental health and well-being.

Dominick worked for Napa Auto Parts as a regional manager responsible for 14 stores and a team of people in British Columbia and the Yukon.

He has also worked for: WestJet Airlines in sales and marketing; with Brink’s Canada; and as business manager at Acklands Grainger, one of Canada’s largest industrial suppliers, during which time he says he supported major projects like the Regina Bypass, several schools and hospitals across the Canada, and more specifically the Seaspan/DND Ship Building initiative for the military and coast guard.

Dominick highlighted his accomplishments as a relationship manager, experienced in procurement, business management and operations. He also highlighted his strengths in the following areas: drafting, negotiating and implementing contracts; marketing; Sales; The advertisement; writing; and planning and organizing.

“The key to much of my success in the corporate world has been relationships and I hope to transcend those skills in this role as a school counselor to support our children with the voice of parents guiding me,” said he declared.

Dominick has volunteered with the Vancouver Police Department, the RCMP, the Canadian Life Boat Coast Guard Auxiliary and as a soccer and hockey coach, as well as many other extra-circular activities that his children have enjoyed. participated, such as theater and martial arts.

“I will work hard to give parents back their voice to shape our children’s future in the right direction to make sure we give them the skills to thrive in the community and do their best to reach their full potential. potential,” he said.

The Maple Ridge – Pitt Meadows School Board is comprised of five directors representing Maple Ridge and two directors representing Pitt Meadows. They are elected every four years at the same time as the mayor and the municipal council of the two municipalities.

The election will take place on Saturday 15 October.


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Camden High’s academic program hailed by US Secretary of Education https://intuttitalia.com/camden-highs-academic-program-hailed-by-us-secretary-of-education/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 08:45:26 +0000 https://intuttitalia.com/camden-highs-academic-program-hailed-by-us-secretary-of-education/ Camden City School DistrictCollege and career readiness program illustrates how schools can help students recover from pandemic and thrive after graduation, says U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona. During a tour of Camden High School, Cardona said the school’s individual post-secondary counseling program was unlike anything he had seen at other high schools. “We want […]]]>
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The Department of Early Childhood of the Ministry of Education implements its development plans https://intuttitalia.com/the-department-of-early-childhood-of-the-ministry-of-education-implements-its-development-plans/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://intuttitalia.com/the-department-of-early-childhood-of-the-ministry-of-education-implements-its-development-plans/ Doha: The Early Childhood Department of the Ministry of Education and Higher Education has affirmed its commitment to achieving the goals and pillars of its strategic plan. This objective is achieved through programs and operational plans aimed at developing teacher performance, which is reflected in the development of students’ skills and abilities. In her remarks, […]]]>

Doha: The Early Childhood Department of the Ministry of Education and Higher Education has affirmed its commitment to achieving the goals and pillars of its strategic plan. This objective is achieved through programs and operational plans aimed at developing teacher performance, which is reflected in the development of students’ skills and abilities.

In her remarks, the director of the Department of Early Childhood, Maryam Al Nisf Al Buainain, said that these efforts are part of the ministry’s desire to build bridges of cooperation and constructive participatory work for the benefit of students. , believing that Qatar always deserves the best.

She noted that the department has been able to achieve many important goals through inspection visits by its supervisors and principals at the start of the current school year to determine schools’ preparations and ensure that they are ready to receive students, the suitability of the classroom and the school environment, safety and security factors, the availability of learning resources and is aware of the seriousness of the application of the instruction for students who receive.

It has been provided to schools before to ensure its implementation in the intended manner.

The Deputy Director of the Early Childhood Department, Dhabia Al Khulaifi, spoke about the department’s efforts to provide urgent educational solutions to best overcome the obstacles that the teacher might face, in order to ensure the quality of the results of the learning, as well as awareness training. support for field managers.

Among them, the “Educational Pioneering Beginnings” program which targeted more than 1,300 teachers and animators in seven different training sessions to launch themselves through it towards the horizons of creativity in giving.

Sharifa Al Yazidi, Head of the Basic Stage Department at the Early Childhood Department, explained the efforts of the Ministry of Education and Higher Education through the department to develop capacities and skills.

In this regard, she said, a program for supervisors has been implemented for the third consecutive year. It includes training on the latest instructional supervision systems and how to provide academic support and the role of the instructional supervisor in providing supportive and supportive feedback that is an addition to the coordinator or teacher through constructive dialogue and effective communication and other extracurricular activities.

Head of the Kindergarten Department, Fatima Al Qahtani, spoke of the distinguished efforts related to this category in terms of training teachers, supervisors and coordinators, and the publication of a set of guidelines for kindergartens. of children.

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Black boys’ special education rights ‘systematically’ violated in DPS, says state complaints officer https://intuttitalia.com/black-boys-special-education-rights-systematically-violated-in-dps-says-state-complaints-officer/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 22:28:17 +0000 https://intuttitalia.com/black-boys-special-education-rights-systematically-violated-in-dps-says-state-complaints-officer/ In a wide range decisiona state complaints officer with the Colorado Department of Education found “widespread” concerns in Denver public schools that it was systematically violating the special education rights of black male students enrolled in district centers for emotionally challenged students. The investigation by the state Department of Education involved 99 students who were […]]]>

In a wide range decisiona state complaints officer with the Colorado Department of Education found “widespread” concerns in Denver public schools that it was systematically violating the special education rights of black male students enrolled in district centers for emotionally challenged students.

The investigation by the state Department of Education involved 99 students who were served at special centers at district schools or an outside school under contract with the district between the spring of 2021 and 2022. The district operates separate classrooms for students with emotional disorders, called affective needs. centers, in 33 Denver schools at the elementary, middle and high school levels.

More than a third of the students at the centers are black boys, while 14% of the district’s enrollment is made up of black students, both male and female.

“Certainly, that’s a disproportionate number of students,” said Pam Bisceglia, executive director of AdvocacyDenver, which advocates for students with disabilities and filed a state lawsuit against the district last spring.

The organization also filed a federal civil rights lawsuit last year alleging a pattern of discrimination against black male students. The federal investigation is ongoing. The complaint asks the Civil Rights Office to order DPS to abolish emotional needs centers and rethink how black students with disabilities are served.

The results weren’t a complete surprise “but these results are certainly telling in all that they uncovered and uncovered…that we have systemic inequities against our students with this unique need in the district,” said Julie Rottier- Lukens, executive director of DPS’ Office of Exceptional Student Services.

“I hope that with these results and the work we hope to do to meet the needs of all students with disabilities, we can make important systemic improvements.”

At issue is how the district implemented its practice of placing students with known or suspected emotional disorders in separate classrooms. Advocates have accused black male students of being disproportionately placed in such classrooms – at rates as high as four and a half times other students – due to the narrow use of biased tests that identify with severe emotional disturbances.

Advocacy Denver calls these placements “one of the most egregious examples of institutionalized racism within Denver public schools.” For years, black men have been over-identified as having severe emotional disability and also tend to be under-identified for programs designed for children diagnosed with autism, she said.

“Certainly, there are children with serious emotional disturbances. But sometimes we can’t help but wonder if there’s this bias in terms of assumptions about where a behavior comes from… There’s this racism where, if the child is black, then somehow he believes the behavior is bigger or scarier.

The district had a plan to dismantle the centers – called Project DISRUPT – but it was dismantled with new leadership in some DPS departments. Bisceglia said the complaints came after years of trying to work with the district through individual schools and administrative remedies.

“Enough was enough,” said Bisceglia, who said she saw children languishing in emotional needs centers from kindergarten through middle school.

Rottier-Lukens of DPS said one of the reasons the DISRUPT project was temporarily disbanded was the recognition that there are several areas where students of color are not receiving the same services and that officials have begun to look into these problems internally.

“We have concerns about disproportionality in many different areas, not just emotional needs programming,” she said. An example is the underrepresentation of children of color in the gifted and talented program. Rottier-Lukens said the remedies the district will undertake align with the DPS’s new strategic roadmap that prioritizes “examining and dismantling systems of oppression.”

Rottier-Lukens said emotional needs centers allow staff to meet the needs of students who require a more restrictive setting.

“While we still have an obligation to provide this continuum of services, we are really trying to shift to more inclusive practices as well.”

During the pandemic, she said district teams began looking at where culture and bias might have played a role in student assessment. For example, some students were experiencing a significant amount of trauma at home, which resulted in certain behaviors at school that may have increased the “perception that students needed a higher level of programming when in reality they were reacting to a trauma in their life.”

State Complaints Officer found five systemic violations

He said the district has consistently failed to conduct comprehensive needs assessments or make proper decisions about students’ eligibility for services under federal education law.

In one case of suspected disability, despite low academic test scores, the district focused on a student’s behavioral issues and did not assess the student’s cognitive abilities. Half of the assessments studied did not use a variety of sources and information to make an assessment, as required by law. The complaints officer said the district also failed to ensure that assessments were selected and administered “in a way that does not discriminate on a racial or cultural basis.”

The Individuals with Disabilities Act also requires students to be educated in their “least restrictive environment,” which he says the district has not done. This means, for example, considering additional aids and services that would make it possible to enroll students in regular classes. The district also failed to ensure that students were able to participate in non-academic and extracurricular activities to the fullest extent possible, the complaint states.

He found that the district failed to send prior written notice to parents of changes in a child’s placement, failed to ensure that teachers in the center’s two programs had the appropriate licensing and certification, and consistently failing to develop, review, and revise a student’s Individual Education Plan. that reflects student needs.

The complaints officer ordered a number of corrective actions, including training for all district special education officials, officials of schools offering emotional needs programs, as well as teachers, social workers and psychologists. schoolchildren who work in the programs. It names specific timelines for corrective action, including compensatory services for some students.

Denver Public Schools provides considerable autonomy to individual schools, especially the charter and innovation schools where some of the centers are located. Generally, schools can decline district training for their staff.

“With the decision, they will be required to participate in training,” Bisceglia said. “In public law, that’s where we don’t allow autonomy… We have to make sure that we meet the range of needs presented by students with disabilities.

Rottier-Lukens said DPS is committed to providing special education staff with the training and support they need.

The DPS, like school districts across the country, has struggled to hire special education staff. She hopes the recently negotiated salary increases will help, as well as a new committee to set standards around workload and workload. More resources could facilitate ongoing support and coaching for special education staff, which would help the district “thoughtfully plan for long-term systemic change.”

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Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with these cultural events – The GW Hatchet https://intuttitalia.com/celebrate-hispanic-heritage-month-with-these-cultural-events-the-gw-hatchet/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 07:20:54 +0000 https://intuttitalia.com/celebrate-hispanic-heritage-month-with-these-cultural-events-the-gw-hatchet/ Media Credit: Photo illustration by Krishna Rajpara I Assistant Photo Editor Watch a film about the 1991 protests that took place in DC after police shot Salvadoran local Daniel Gomez at Art All Night, the district’s annual arts festival in Mount Pleasant. Thursday marks the first day of Hispanic Heritage Month, ringing in a cultural […]]]>

Media Credit: Photo illustration by Krishna Rajpara I Assistant Photo Editor

Watch a film about the 1991 protests that took place in DC after police shot Salvadoran local Daniel Gomez at Art All Night, the district’s annual arts festival in Mount Pleasant.

Thursday marks the first day of Hispanic Heritage Month, ringing in a cultural celebration of food, music and fierce social change that will last until mid-October.

A mix of dynamic events on campus and across DC pay homage to the characteristics of Hispanic culture that have shaped DMV communities for generations. Celebrate Hispanic culture on campus, learn how to cook a traditional Mexican meal at the National Museum of American History, and learn about the history of discrimination that has targeted the Hispanic community throughout the region.

To make the most of what Hispanic Heritage Month has to offer, don’t miss these events:

All Month: Multicultural Student Services Center Latinx Heritage Celebration
Each year, the MSSC selects a theme that guides the month-long celebrations for the cultural mosaic on campus. MSSC Graduate Studies Coordinator Keyla Ruiz said this year Latin American student-run organizations like GW Alianza and the Organization for Latin American Students have partnered with MSSC to reveal the 2022 theme. , “Community united, cannot be divided”. She said the theme reflects the collaboration between Latin American organizations and the MSSC to plan the month-long celebration, in addition to the difficulties of recent years that have broken communities. To kick off the celebrations this month, Ruiz said OLAS is hosting “Meet the Familia” on Thursday for the GW Latino community to come together in the first of a series of events. She said student cultural performances, guest lectures and educational sessions will take place throughout the month, including a conversation on gun violence that will be hosted by Lambda Pi Chia Latina-based sorority at GW.

Learn more about the annual list of celebrations here.

Saturday, September 17: Cooking History: Celebrating Comida Chingona and the Low-Rider Lifestyle
Feast your eyes on a free cooking demonstration with Chef Silvana Salcido Esparza, who strong points Mexican-American culture as she prepares her signature smoked cochinita pibil – a traditional Mexican dish made with pork and vegetables grilled in banana leaves – at the National Museum of American History. Esparza honors his legacy through the food at his Phoenix-based restaurant and create its own distinctive versions of traditional dishes. She will share her interest in lowrider cars that young Mexican American men in the Phoenix area would like conduct. Known as “pachucos,” these men are said to have clashed with law enforcement and defended Hispanic civil rights since the 1950s. Esparza will explain how the long-standing lifestyle that accompanies these customizable vehicles is tied to culture Phoenix food.

1300 Constitution Ave. NW, between 12th and 14th streets. Noon to 1 p.m. Free. Find more information here.

Sunday, September 18: Latinx Caribbean Heritage Panel – Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa and Carmen Rita Wong
Listen to a panel of Latin Caribbean authors in an intimate conversation about their heritage, culture and upbringing at Political and Prose Library near Chevy Chase. The event will feature two distinguished writers, Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa and Carmen Rita Wong, who will discuss their shared Caribbean heritage. Much of Llanos-Figueroa’s work revolves around her education in rural Puerto Rico and the influence of the stories that the older women in her family shared. Wong is the founder and CEO of media company Malecon Productions, LLC and the author of two best-selling financial advice books. The panel will explore what it means to be a Hispanic professional using literature as a form of cultural expression, both as a writer and a teacher.

5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 3 p.m. Free, first come, first served. Find more information here.

Friday, September 23: Screening of La Manplesa: An Uprising Remembered
Watch a movie about the 1991 protests which took place in DC after police shot Salvadoran local Daniel Gomez at Art All Night – the district’s annual arts festival in Mount Pleasant. The local Latino community rose up against law enforcement in protests after the shooting, torching police cruisers and fleeing tear gas in the streets. “La Manplesa” explore how the protests took shape and pays homage to lesser-known stories of police brutality that have affected Hispanic victims. The film preserves the experiences of the Salvadoran community during the protests and highlights their contribution to social change. Hear testimonies, songs and poetry from activists and advocates, who capture the adversity faced by racial minorities in DC as you watch the film in the same neighborhood where the uprising took place.

Address not yet available. Mount Pleasant. Free. Find more information here.

Saturday, September 24: Hispanic Heritage Month Comedy Show – “I SURVIVED LA CHANCLA”
Enjoy a comedy night on the intimate stage at Simple Bar and Grill, one of DC’s local venues for Sunday comedy shows. This month, the stage will spotlight a range of Latino comedians, including Gabriel Rojo, Roxette, Hector Castro and Elena Torres who have performed at popular venues like DC Improv and Broadway Comedy Club. The title of the show refers to the shared punishment of immigrant Latin mothers who use “la chancla”, the slipper or the flip-flop. A cheeky yet authentic tribute to the Hispanic experience, the show is a lively way to support and honor Hispanic creatives.

Simple Bar and Grill, 5802 Georgia Ave. NW. 7 p.m. Admission is $10. To buy tickets here.

All Month: alt.Latino: NPR’s Latinx Arts and Culture Broadcast
Tune into NPR’s alt.Latino show to listen to podcasts covering the Latino music scene through creative storytelling within the Hispanic community. By delivering compelling stories every week, alt.Latino ensures that Hispanic voices are heard on one of the biggest news stages. Listen to the program throughout the year and hear NPR’s Felix Contreras and Anamaria Sayre sit down with Latino artists to discuss historically Hispanic genres – old and new – in the history of Latino artists and the gender and racial implications related to Latin culture. Music and storytelling, as the epicenter of Hispanic culture, remains a vital way to express Latino heritage and experience, so explore the weekly podcast to honor those traditions.

Discover new articles and podcasts here.

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6 cases in which patients improved despite their initial diagnosis https://intuttitalia.com/6-cases-in-which-patients-improved-despite-their-initial-diagnosis/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 14:25:02 +0000 https://intuttitalia.com/6-cases-in-which-patients-improved-despite-their-initial-diagnosis/ Source: Owl Vision Studio/Shutterstock Health care providers are trained to make a diagnosis to guide the course of assessment and treatment of physical and mental health issues. A diagnosis can help healthcare providers quickly decide on appropriate therapy courses based on scientific evidence for specific therapies. In addition, a diagnosis helps classify the patient, including […]]]>

Source: Owl Vision Studio/Shutterstock

Health care providers are trained to make a diagnosis to guide the course of assessment and treatment of physical and mental health issues.

A diagnosis can help healthcare providers quickly decide on appropriate therapy courses based on scientific evidence for specific therapies. In addition, a diagnosis helps classify the patient, including for purposes of insurance billing and provision of appropriate non-medical services such as Individualized Educational Plans (IEPs) in schools, housing, and on-site accommodation. workplace, and the availability of emotional support animals.

Thought Locked Out by Healthcare Providers

When a diagnosis is made, healthcare providers often focus on providing therapy for the diagnosis. When a patient does not fully respond to treatment, the usual assumption by providers is either that the patient did not carefully follow the prescribed treatment plan, or that the treatment plan was insufficient (for example, the patient needs a higher dose of prescribed medication or an escalation of behavioral intervention.) These assumptions, too often, are wrong.

Three cases from my medical practice as a pediatric pulmonologist illustrate this type of locked-in thinking. It should be noted that I have encountered such situations monthly throughout my career of almost 40 years.

A nine-year-old child with asthma. This patient presented with recurrent cough, wheezing, and shortness of breath that temporarily improved with rescue asthma inhaler therapy. His breath test revealed asthma. Despite intensive preventive asthma therapy, she continued to have frequent respiratory symptoms.

Her health care provider thought it was obvious that the patient must not have taken her preventer medications, as they are known to be effective in treating asthma. Therefore, the provider continued to pressure the patient to take the prescribed medications for two years.

It turned out that most of this patient’s symptoms were related to her anxiety, which largely resolved after she was taught how to regulate her emotions through hypnosis. In this case, the diagnosis was incomplete. The patient suffered from asthma and anxiety, and asthma treatment alone was insufficient.

A 14-year-old boy suffering from shortness of breath. This young woman was diagnosed with asthma when she developed shortness of breath while exercising at age four. She had no other asthma symptoms. She never developed a cough, wheeze or shortness of breath when she had a cold or when she was exposed to cats or dogs, to which she was known to be allergic. (She developed a stuffy nose and itchy eyes around furry animals.)

His physical examination was normal. His breath test was normal. Nevertheless, an asthma specialist prescribed an inhaled steroid for 10 years to treat asthma. The patient said she did not know if this medication helped.

In the year before I met her, this patient’s shortness of breath worsened while she participated in dance competitions. When I asked, she told me that her breathing difficulties occur when she tries to inhale and when this happens she makes a loud noise (stridor) while inhaling.

His symptoms were consistent with a diagnosis of vocal cord dysfunction rather than asthma. She fit the typical profile of a patient with this diagnosis, including being a high-performing female athlete (line A). Her symptoms disappeared immediately after she learned to use self-hypnosis to calm herself down.

A 17-year-old boy with cystic fibrosis (CF). This young man was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis based on a sweat test during infancy (which is the diagnosis of this medical condition and was how cystic fibrosis was diagnosed before the advent of genetic testing at the beginning of the 2000’s). He was treated at a cystic fibrosis center for his entire life.

His lungs remained healthy, but he was reluctant to receive chest physical therapy by hand or with a mechanical chest vibration device, which is necessary to prevent the progression of lung disease in this life-threatening condition. Therefore, he was treated with valium twice a day before each physiotherapy session.

When this patient was referred to me, I noted that his diagnosis of cystic fibrosis was made based on a single sweat test. Given the serious implications of such a diagnosis, my practice has always been to repeat the diagnostic test, as test errors occur on rare occasions. It turned out that he did not have cystic fibrosis and that this patient had been misdiagnosed.

Had his doctors reconsidered his diagnosis, given that he had never shown signs of the progressive lung disease characteristic of cystic fibrosis at that time, he would have been spared many years of unnecessary and disruptive treatment.

Thought locked by patients

Health care providers sometimes inadvertently lead to the perpetuation of patient symptoms or behavior due to a diagnosis. Again, a few examples show how such situations can occur.

A 15-year-old boy with recurrent pneumonia. The patient presented with a history of three episodes of pneumonia per year for some years. The patient would miss a month of school with each of these illnesses.

After reviewing his background, physical exam, and lab studies, I could find nothing physically wrong with him other than mild asthma, for which he was overtreated. I noted that the patient was anxious. As a pulmonologist, I was aware that asthma flare-ups could often cause radiological findings that were misinterpreted as pneumonia.

I treated the patient in descending his asthma treatment and teaching him self-hypnosis. He no longer developed pneumonia. Over the next few years, he developed colds a few times, which made him ill for a few days. Given his improvement with the calming associated with hypnosis, I suspected he felt so sick when he was diagnosed with pneumonia because he believed he had serious illnesses.

A 50-year-old man with high cholesterol and diabetes. For years I had high cholesterol. My doctor told me that since my mother had the same problem, I suffered from a genetic condition: high cholesterol, which put me at a higher risk of developing a heart attack or stroke. I accepted this diagnosis and felt there was nothing I could do about it because it was genetic. Therefore, I agreed to start therapy with a statin, which is an oral medication that lowers cholesterol levels. However, I did not change my lifestyle.

When I was diagnosed with type II diabetes, my doctor almost locked me into that diagnosis as well, as he offered to aggressively treat me with insulin and regularly monitor my diet, kidney function and my sight. As an aside, he told me that if I lost a lot of weight, maybe I could reverse my diabetes. He said he didn’t think that would happen. I took it as a challenge to do something about my condition.

When I lost a lot of weight afterwards, it solved my diabetes, my cholesterol level also became normal and I no longer needed statin treatment. I didn’t realize that even though my genes could predispose me to developing diabetes and high cholesterol, I had the ability to prevent these genetic predispositions from causing difficulties by solving my obesity.

A 13-year-old boy with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). After adding counseling to my practice, this patient came to me to talk about his disruptive behavior related to his ADHD. He was unable to tolerate medication for his condition as it caused him significant side effects.

This patient was very intelligent and easily bored in school. As a result, his behavior there worsened. When his parents and teachers discussed his impulsive behavior and lack of focus with him, he replied, “There’s nothing I can do about it. It’s because of my ADHD.”

I explained to the patient that even though he had been diagnosed with ADHD, he was able to control his behavior. Fortunately, this patient showed great interest in helping himself and improved dramatically once he learned to effectively regulate his emotions with hypnotic techniques. I encouraged the family to find him additional educational opportunities outside of school that would help him better meet his intellectual abilities.

Carry

As these cases illustrate, treatment based solely on a patient’s diagnosis can sometimes be ineffective. Additionally, a patient’s reactions to a diagnosis or an incomplete understanding of its implications can also lead to poorer outcomes.

In today’s world, patients often have precious little time with their healthcare providers. Nevertheless, I believe that health professionals must take the time to be aware of the difficulties that can be caused by establishing a diagnosis.

Best health care practices occur when clinicians and patients pay meaningful attention to all symptoms and patient responses to treatment rather than focusing primarily on treating a diagnosis.

Copyright Ran D. Anbar

To find a therapist near you, visit Psychology Today’s Directory of Therapies.

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Oakland to Return Land Rights to an Indigenous Group https://intuttitalia.com/oakland-to-return-land-rights-to-an-indigenous-group/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 22:43:03 +0000 https://intuttitalia.com/oakland-to-return-land-rights-to-an-indigenous-group/ The City of Oakland plans to return five acres of Joaquin Miller Park to permanent Native control, in what is believed to be the first instance of a city returning land to Natives. Under the proposed “cultural conservation easement”, Oakland would retain ownership of the designated area, but the Sogorea Te’ Land Trust would have […]]]>

The City of Oakland plans to return five acres of Joaquin Miller Park to permanent Native control, in what is believed to be the first instance of a city returning land to Natives.

Under the proposed “cultural conservation easement”, Oakland would retain ownership of the designated area, but the Sogorea Te’ Land Trust would have almost total control over the use of the land, for cultural, environmental and educational purposes, in perpetuity.

“It’s a way for us to take this land and reimagine what it might have looked like,” Corrina Gould, co-director of Sogorea Te’ and tribal spokesperson for the Confederate Villages of Lisjan, said at a conference in press Thursday.

“We have a vision of a place in the hills that overlooks our territory, that holds us in a basket. It is a way for us to tell our story as the people of Lisjan and to involve our loved ones from all walks of life in the stewardship of this land,” she said.

The Sogorea Te’ Land Trust was founded in 2015 by Indigenous women who had worked for many years on efforts to facilitate the return of indigenous and sacred urban lands to the Bay Area.

The Joaquin Miller site restitution project has been in the works since 2018, when Mayor Libby Schaaf first met Gould after watching the documentary “Beyond Recognition.” Schaaf asked Gould if she saw any opportunities to give land back to Oakland. Sogorea Te’ members searched for a culturally significant location and focused on Sequoia Point near Skyline Boulevard, which features a flat, cobblestone vista with sweeping views of the city and bay, as well as a thick grove of trees. trees.

“Today we let the healing begin,” Schaaf said at the press conference, held in a shady spot above Joaquin Miller Road. “Today is the day we recognize the harm that government and colonization did to the original inhabitants of this land. The original sin of indigenous genocide that happened right here on this land was just the beginning of additional laws and acts of exclusion that have occurred over generations.

City officials and members of Sogorea Te’ pose with the rendering of the structure the land trust is considering for the site. Corrina Gould and Mayor Libby Schaaf stand directly on either side of the display. Credit: Amir Aziz

On Tuesday, September 13, City Council Member Sheng Thao, whose district includes Sequoia Point, will host a Zoom community meeting with the land trust to discuss the proposal. Eventually, the plan will have to be approved by the city council.

“When Corrina Gould first showed me this, my jaw dropped,” Thao said. “Not just because of the beauty, but what it means to give back the land. This is just the beginning.”

At the event, Gould unveiled a rendering of a structure being considered for the site, designed to look like an inverted Ohlone basket. Gould said the only remaining baskets used by the Ohlone people belong to the British Museum.

Other ideas for the land include seasonal ceremonies, replacing invasive plants with species native to the area, and opening an education center, land trust co-director Johnella LaRose told The Oaklandside.

The area will continue to be open to the public, and the hope is to make it a comfortable place for many people and communities who may currently feel unwelcome in the hills or the park, LaRose said.

“People don’t know this exists, so when they come they get profiled,” said LaRose, who is Shoshone Bannock and a member of the Ute tribe.

The deal between Oakland and Sogorea Te’ comes at a time of growing demands for reparations in the form of property being returned to Indigenous peoples. The United States Army and white settlers conducted a genocidal war against the tribes of California in the mid-1800s. A primary goal of this state-sanctioned violence was to steal land for gold mining, agriculture, and the building of settlements and cities . The surviving Aboriginal peoples carried on their cultural traditions and increasingly asserted their land rights since the 1960s.

At several points during Thursday’s press conference, community members released a call-and-response chant of “Returning Earth!”

Gould said she and her staff began working on “protecting sacred sites” in the Bay Area at a time when most residents were unfamiliar with the terms Ohlone and Lisjan.

“Who knew that over 20 years later, the earth would start coming back to us in pieces,” she said.

Part of the Sequoia Point property is a flat, paved lookout over the bay. Alongside it is a thick grove of tall trees. Credit: Amir Aziz

While nonprofits and land trusts have been facilitating land returns to Indigenous groups for some time, this appears to be the first time a city has taken ownership public, said Brendan Moriarty, who manages real estate. of the city and works on the easement. He said the deal will include protections against future city leaders who cancel the deal.

“We can come and go, but property rights are forever,” he said.

The city will retain the right to go to the lot in the event of an emergency, such as a wildfire or red flag day, and can help manage the property.

Schaaf noted that the city could eventually sell the land to Sogorea Te’, but said it would be a bureaucratically complicated process.

The easement plan has been widely adopted so far, said several people affiliated with the project, including the president of Joaquin Miller Park Friendsa group that works to preserve and improve the territory.

“We couldn’t be happier about this – they will be wonderful neighbours,” said Dale Risden, noting that the land trust shares the environmental stewardship mission of the Friends group.

Because Oakland is the first city to continue this process, Gould said she hopes the agreement serves as a “model” for others.

“My hope is to come back all over California, everywhere,” she said.

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Struggling law school seeks to reinvent itself https://intuttitalia.com/struggling-law-school-seeks-to-reinvent-itself/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 07:11:08 +0000 https://intuttitalia.com/struggling-law-school-seeks-to-reinvent-itself/ South Royalton, Vt., is a quiet, unassuming town with a population of just over 600. Like most colonial-era New England hamlets, it has a handful of historic buildings and landmarks, including a memorial commemorating the birthplace of Joseph Smith, founder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. South Royalton’s main claim to […]]]>

South Royalton, Vt., is a quiet, unassuming town with a population of just over 600. Like most colonial-era New England hamlets, it has a handful of historic buildings and landmarks, including a memorial commemorating the birthplace of Joseph Smith, founder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

South Royalton’s main claim to fame, however, is that it is home to Green Mountain State’s only law school.

Vermont Law School has dispensed juris doctor degrees to students from across New England and beyond since 1972. Many have come to the sleepy central Vermont village because of the college’s emphasis on the environmental law and policy, as well as his progressive vision of justice.

But like many smaller institutions across the country, in recent years, VLS has suffered from declining enrollment, shifting regional demographics, and shaky finances. Now the only college in Vermont that offers a JD is looking to reinvent itself by betting big on a new slate of master’s degree programs.

In June, officials announced a restructuring plan that includes adding three new master’s programs and changing the college’s name to Vermont Law and Graduate School, a rebranding that officials hope will better sum up the growing diversity of its educational offerings.

The redesign was made possible in part by an anonymous donation of $8 million, the largest ever received by the independent college.

The law school offered a handful of master’s degrees, including the standard Master of Laws (LLM), even before it added the “G” to its acronym. The restructuring, however, adds degree offerings to the graduate school and places equal emphasis on its non-JD programs. It also greatly expands student options for online courses.

Rodney Smolla, a seasoned lawyer and higher education leader, took over as president of Vermont Law and Graduate School in July, just weeks after the changes were announced. He said the college’s innovative restructuring plan and progressive history attracted him to the position.

“There is real richness in trying to approach these issues from both a traditional legal perspective and a public policy perspective,” he said. “You could deliver a lot more in terms of educational opportunities if you invested as much or nearly as much on the public policy side as you do on the traditional law side.”

Declining enrollment is a concern across higher education, but it has particularly affected law schools. Interest in JD programs plummeted after the 2008 recession, and although numbers have dwindled at the top and down since then, law school enrollments have not been what they used to be.

Vermont Law School is no different. According Law School Transparency dataVLS hosted a class of 212 first-year law students in 2010, but by 2013 that number had dropped to 129.

The decline led to financial difficulties, which were exacerbated by VLS’s independent status, which meant it was not backed by a university or larger system that could help defray the costs. In 2018, the college reduced the tenure of many faculty as part of a broader restructuring effort to address budget shortfalls.

Smolla thinks the trajectory is changing. Last year, the class of incoming JD candidates numbered 174, the highest for the college since the recession. This year there are 150 new JD residential students; a new online JD program has already filled its share of 20 spots and now has a waiting list.

“I think we’ve turned the corner,” Smolla said. “I am very optimistic.”

Small College Blues in Green Mountain State

It’s been a tough decade for small liberal arts colleges in Vermont. In 2019, three private institutions within 100 miles of each other closed: Green Mountain College, the College of St. Joseph, and Southern Vermont College. A fourth institution, Marlboro College, became the Marlboro Institute when it merged with Emerson College in Boston the same year.

Karen Gross served as president of Bennington-based Southern Vermont College from 2006 to 2014. She said to survive, small colleges must be ambitious in both recruiting strategies and educational offerings.

“VLGS should be commended for trying to innovate, and I think what they’ve done and broken down silos, moved more programs online and stayed close to their mission is smart,” she said. “But I wonder if it’s too little, too late.”

Gross, who is also a former senior policy adviser to the U.S. Department of Education, said small law schools as well as colleges in Vermont are under increasing pressure to stand out in a crowded market with a shrinking customer base. She thinks her own college could have been saved if it weren’t for a “lack of creativity and boldness” on the part of the leaders who succeeded her, and she fears that VLGS suffers from a similar deficiency.

“What they did was move the needle 15 degrees. You have to move the needle 160 degrees,” Gross said. “Now is not the time to tweak the margins. Want to do something different? Go big.”

Smolla said he was confident in the strategic plan of VLGS, adding that the college has some advantages that other small institutions do not have. Its progressive mission and status as Vermont’s only law school have made it a cause celeb of many state policy makers and philanthropists.

“People care, the government cares, our senators care. Because it’s so important to the state,” he said. “That’s an advantage we have that you wouldn’t necessarily see at a small liberal arts college in the middle of the Midwest with many other competing schools.”

Smolla also noted VLGS’s unique focus on environmental issues, which he hopes will draw students to campus as well as its online programs, which he says share the same ethos.

“That’s always been the romance of this beautiful, rural, mountainous state: the idea that people who care about the environment can also enjoy being in the environment, in nature,” he said. “But this Vermont state of mind is more than just a physical location; it’s a culture and an attitude…so you could take our classes from Los Angeles or from China, but in a sense you would still be in Vermont.

“Diversifying the product range”

According American Bar Association data, one in six law students was enrolled in a non-JD program during the 2020-2021 school year. In some law schools, such as the James E. Rogers College of Law at the University of Arizonastudents in non-JD programs far outnumber traditional law students.

“If you look at it from a purely economic perspective, it just diversifies the product line,” said Brian Tamanaha, a law professor at Washington University in St. Louis. “If you find that your potential consumers are drying up or insufficient to support your business, it makes sense to explore what other products you can offer.”

These law-adjacent master’s degree programs provide legal training in specific issues that could be useful to those pursuing careers in politics, consulting, accounting, nonprofit advocacy work, or a number of other areas where legal knowledge is useful but a JD is not required.

Many law schools offer master’s degree programs in tax law and entertainment law, for example; VLGS’s expanded degree offerings build on its carefully cultivated niche. The new master’s offerings – environmental policy, energy regulation, food and agricultural policy, and restorative justice – all tie in with its long-standing mission of training students to use the law to fight for justice and environmental protection. .

Smolla believes that as the climate crisis worsens and the problems of environmental injustice increasingly popular, VLGS degree offerings will be more useful and in demand than ever.

“There will be a lot of students who aren’t interested in becoming practicing lawyers or going to law school for three years, but who care about those intersections in various ways,” Smolla said. “Our feeling was that we could attract a lot of students that we don’t currently have.”

Tamanaha, author of Law school failure (University of Chicago Press, 2012), is, by his own admission, a cynical observer of the legal education landscape. Still, he said while there’s reason to be skeptical about the value of non-JD law school programs, expanding degree options is both a savvy business decision and a way to respond. at the request of students.

“For many schools, this could eventually become the main source of income,” Tamanaha said. “If they keep adding masters programs and keep seeing the pool of JDs dwindle, maybe that’s what will make the operation work.”

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The principal of a Catholic high school shows what is possible https://intuttitalia.com/the-principal-of-a-catholic-high-school-shows-what-is-possible/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 15:58:22 +0000 https://intuttitalia.com/the-principal-of-a-catholic-high-school-shows-what-is-possible/ PHILADELPHIA — When she was in fifth grade, Jayda Pugliese realized “something was wrong.” As a student at St. Mary Interparochial School in Philadelphia, she struggled to keep up in class. His world was silent, due to a progressive disease that was attacking his auditory nerves. An adept lip-reader, Pugliese managed to get regular hearing […]]]>

PHILADELPHIA — When she was in fifth grade, Jayda Pugliese realized “something was wrong.”

As a student at St. Mary Interparochial School in Philadelphia, she struggled to keep up in class. His world was silent, due to a progressive disease that was attacking his auditory nerves.


An adept lip-reader, Pugliese managed to get regular hearing tests until his condition reached crisis point and his grades began to drop.

Today, 25 years later, Pugliese is the director of St. Mary Interparochial and an internationally recognized educational leader whose work combines sustainability and spirituality.

“I’ve come full circle,” she said. “I let go and let God.”

Pugliese said she “felt extremely supported” at St. Mary Interparochial after her condition was fully diagnosed.

“They were so inclusive and so caring,” she said. “I had speech therapy the whole time, and they set up ASL (American Sign Language) classes.”

She also participated in the Deaf Apostolate of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, led by Immaculate Heart of Mary Sister Kathleen Schipani, whom Pugliese described as a “guiding light”.

And she found a heavenly mentor in Philadelphia-born St. Katharine Drexel, whose cause for canonization was confirmed by two healings of hearing-impaired people.

Pugliese credits the saint’s intercession with helping him slow down his own degenerative condition, allowing him to complete his studies.

“She became my boss,” Pugliese said. “For a long time my nerve damage stopped, and I always say it’s due to St. Katharine Drexel. I needed it to stop so I could finish school.

At the same time, Pugliese – who uses hearing aids – describes herself as “a deaf person in a talking world” and “an active advocate for deaf people”.

While at the former St. Maria Goretti (now Neumann-Goretti) High School in Philadelphia, she started an ASL program, got involved in youth organizations, and “kicked off” with her academics , building on the momentum she had gained in seventh and eighth grades.

At Holy Family University in Philadelphia, Pugliese earned her bachelor’s degree in special education and elementary education and her master’s degree in TESOL (teaching English to speakers of other languages) and literacy.

His teaching skills – honed in Philadelphia’s public and charter schools – quickly earned him professional recognition. In 2016, she received the Milken Educator Award (often equated with the Oscars for teaching) in Pennsylvania.

The timing was providential, since Pugliese had been temporarily forced to stop her doctoral studies at Holy Family University for financial reasons.

“I remember sitting in church crying,” said Pugliese, a member of St. Paul’s Parish in South Philadelphia. “I said to God, ‘I don’t know what your plan is for me, but I’m going to put it in your hands.'”

With the award funding a significant portion of her degree, Pugliese – who was later named the 2018 National Science Teachers Association Sylvia Shugrue Awardee and 2019 finalist for Pennsylvania Teacher of the Year – now expects to receive her Ph.D. next year.

Earlier this summer, she completed a week of collaboration at the Kansas-based Lowell Milken Center for Unsung Heroes as one of the organization’s 2022 fellows.

Pugliese has traveled the world giving presentations and training on educational best practices, accessible teaching, and the integration of STEAM-based technology for classrooms.

And in the process, it also spreads the Gospel message.

“One of the biggest things I’m known for is merging the United Nations-created Sustainable Development Goals with the Corporal Works of Mercy,” Pugliese said.

St. Mary’s classrooms are the laboratory for this synthesis, she said.

With two grants from the Pennsylvania-based Ambassador’s Fund for Catholic Education, the school is creating a fleet of STREAM (science, technology, religion, engineering, arts, and math) carts for use in the classroom, while piloting a business training course that instills “servant learning, servant leadership and empathy,” Pugliese said.

Those qualities rule her own life, she said, noting that her hearing level “is absolutely at its worst right now.”

“I could go completely deaf in five to seven years,” Pugliese said. “I will trust God and let him decide what happens.”

Whatever the prognosis, she plans to stay in education.

“Maybe I can pave the way for more people with disabilities who want to move into leadership positions,” Pugliese said. “I want to show that it is possible.”

– – –

Christian is senior content producer for CatholicPhilly.com, the news site for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

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